Tag Archives: Robert Duffy

Mayoral Control Lost Momentum

The Democrat and Chronicle reported today Assemblyman David Gantt would reintroduce his legislation giving Rochester’s mayor control of the school district.

This is not a surprise, as it has already passed the assembly. The bill has powerful allies in Gantt, Assemblyman Joe Morelle, Lieutenant Governor Bob Duffy and the business community. But the state senate is a lot trickier, as senators Joe Robach and Jim Alesi have expressed strong reservations.

Meanwhile, a lot has changed in the two years since then-Mayor Duffy campaigned for control of schools.

  • We have a new mayor who may not want the job as badly as his predecessor. Tom Richards  never talks about mayoral control unless prompted and doesn’t do so with any depth. While Richards has expressed support for mayoral control, I find it hard to believe Albany would hand over control of a $700-million-a-year, 32,000-student district to a man who lacks any outward passion for taking the reigns. There’s still time for Richards to show he wants control of the district. So far, he hasn’t laid out any vision.
  • Opposition to mayoral control has grown among area residents. The 2011 Voice of the Voter poll shows 50 percent of respondents oppose and 38 percent support mayoral control. In the 2010 poll, only 30 percent opposed mayoral control.
  • New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s record on education has been knocked in polls and gains in test scores under his leadership were nearly wiped out.
  • The Rochester City School District is no longer run by mayoral-control-friendly Jean-Claude Brizard.  The district is in a state of relative calm compared to the turmoil of the last few years. Is it time to rock the apple cart as the school board searches for a new leader – one who may already be in the position? Maybe it’s the perfect time, if you want to install the mayor as chief.

Downtown Rochester’s Image Crisis

A few days ago, I was doing a live report across the street from the Liberty Pole. I saw a woman carrying a briefcase being escorted to a parking garage by the “red-shirts,” paid guides and security patrols funded by the downtown business district.

Has it come to this?

I hate when people say “perception is reality” when referring to the safety of downtown Rochester. It really isn’t. Statistically, downtown is the safest part of the city. That’s probably because no one is around after dark, but it’s still true.

I loathe admitting this, but statistics don’t matter so much right now. The city has a perception crisis on its hands, thanks to a few pretty bad realities.

First, Monroe Community College decided to move out of the Sibley Building. Safety was clearly a huge issue, with the college president citing police calls for service. (Of course Sibley has more calls for service; there are more people there. Also, there’s no way of knowing if those calls for service will follow MCC over to the new site.) Anne Kress also talked about women feeling unsafe and being groped and harassed near the Liberty Pole. That’s totally unacceptable and indeed not a safe environment.

When Bob Duffy was police chief, he closed the downtown police section through consolidation. Then as mayor, he closed Midtown Plaza, which turned the Liberty Pole into a hangout for teens and loiterers. The city’s solution was to put up an ugly police trailer and portable toilets. Police on horseback patrolled when school let out. Fighting among youth and loitering continued.

Now MCC has devastated the city’s image by so loudly proclaiming Main Street to be unsafe. MCC bluntly told the city perception is reality.

Second, Genesee Brewing Company CEO Rich Lozyniak doesn’t plan to open the brewery’s proposed visitors center and restaurant in the evening hours because of the neighborhood’s safety. The brewery is not exactly “downtown,” but it’s directly across from High Falls and just north of the Inner Loop. Lozyniak said two of his late-shift employees were mugged over the summer. He wasn’t taking a chance guests would be similarly accosted.

Lozyniak’s decision is understandable, but it’s frustrating to the city’s cheerleaders.

I haven’t seen this much angst about safety issues in the city since the decision to build the soccer stadium off Lyell Ave. That actually is a troubled neighborhood. In the years since, we haven’t heard of any soccer fans becoming crime victims. Yet there are people who still won’t go to games because of the stadium location and the perception of safety.

I’m not sure of a solution beyond development that brings lots of people to our center city, creating such diversity and activity, everyone is comfortable – and safe.

Renaissance Square Regrets?

We should talk about Renaissance Square.

I join you in wishing we never, ever have to talk about the failed project again, but this week’s events make it necessary.

Renaissance Square would have combined a performing arts center, bus station and Monroe Community College campus on the northwest corner of Main and Clinton. A bunch of eyesore buildings would have been knocked down. The $230 million project was funded with the exception of a performing arts center.

The project was led by Republican Maggie Brooks. Democrats (and the public) never warmed up to it. When then-Mayor Robert Duffy finally became engaged with the details – after $24 million and years of planning – he had major reservations. Bickering over performing arts center funding and the size of the bus terminal ended up dooming the project.

Did I mention Renaissance Square was funded??? The bus company told the city if money for the theater never materialized, the city would get that parcel back for development. A clean shovel-ready site at Main and Clinton. (I’ve always believed a theater could be funded if the mayor and county executive truly championed it.)

But City Hall effectively killed Renaissance Square. Brooks could have continued negotiations with the city, but she’d had enough. She shares some blame for walking away, but it’s not like Duffy went running after her to salvage anything.  The whole thing left Senator Chuck Schumer, who fought for project funding, truly baffled.

Fast forward two years. The bus terminal will be breaking ground this spring in the same Renaissance Square location with essentially the same design.  MCC is saying “good riddance” to Main Street, putting in jeopardy plans to develop the Sibley Building. A performing arts center hasn’t raised any funds and would be more expensive to build at the preferred Midtown site. The eyesore block at Main and Clinton still stands, with no development proposals ostensibly in the works.

Killing Renaissance Square had major consequences. The biggest, we now see, is MCC’s departure from the heart of downtown. Unless developers come out of the woodwork to revitalize Main Street, the death of that project still looms large.